Professor Matthew Manning

B.Com (Economics), MA (Hons), PhD
Professor
College Arts & Social Sciences

Areas of expertise

  • Applied Economics 1402
  • Criminology 1602
  • Causes And Prevention Of Crime 160201
  • Criminological Theories 160204

Biography

Professor Manning is a criminological economist and future crimes scholar. As well as forecasting how new technologies can be exploited by criminals, Professor Manning studies which policing strategies really work. As a future crimes scholar he is committed to advancing knowledge about: (1) why individuals commit future crimes; (2) the processes that can be adopted to make committing future crimes more difficult and less rewarding; and (3) the tools that assist government and industry in making strategic economic decisions that create efficiency and enhance return on investment. His work in this area has contributed to the development of theories for identifying where and how individuals commit these forms of crime, processes that minimise insider threat, and tools that provide economic evidence that assist in policy decision making.

Researcher's projects

Current projects

Imputing missing values using AI - Collaboration with the Research School of Computer Science ANU and the Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science.

Economic Support and Reporting APP (ESRT) - ESRT is being developed to assist members of community coalitions (including government) to develop economic evidence around programs and interventions that support children and families.

Smart Cost-Benefit Tools - Collaboration with the Research School of Computer Science ANU and the Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science, University College London.

Metropolitan Police Ring Doorbell Evaluation (Metropolitan Police UK). Collaborative project with University College London.

Economic analysis of the CREATE-ing Pathways to Child Wellbeing. ARC Funded project.

Development of a flexible smart criminal justice cost-benefit tool: Does crime prevention pay? Research School of Social Sciences (RSSS) Cross-College grant with funding from RSSS, the Centre for Social Research and Methods, Research School of Computer Science and the Jill Dando Institute Department of Security and Crime Science, University College London.

Completed projects

2019

Systematic review of studies examining the price elasticity of demand for illicit drugs, Australian Institute of Criminology.

2018

Review and guidelines on best practice to reduce the risks of re-offending for adult offenders, Housing Plus.

2017

Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) of a Justice Reinvestment approach in Cowra NSW, funded by the Lowitja Institute and New South Wales Department of Justice.

Development of a flexible smart criminal justice cost-benefit tool: Does crime prevention pay? Research School of Social Sciences (RSSS) Cross-College grant with funding from RSSS, the Centre for Social Research and Methods, Research School of Computer Science and the Jill Dando Institute Department of Security and Crime Science, University College London.

Economic analysis of the CREATE-ing Pathways to Child Wellbeing, funded by Griffith University.

2016

CREATE-ing Pathways to Child Wellbeing in Disadvantaged Communities, funded by Department of Social Services (AUD507,000)

Review of the NSW Treasury project: Estimating criminal justice system marginal costs – NSW Police, courts and corrections, funded by NSW Treasury and the New South Wales Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research.

2015

Determining the cost of alcohol to law enforcement, funded by National Drug and Law Enforcement Research Fund.

2014

Evaluation, Aboriginal Children and Family Justice Project, funded by Jesuit Social Services, Victoria.

An analysis of the impact of arrest with other processes on crime rates and recidivism in New South Wales, funded by NSW Police and the New South Wales Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research.

Creating conditions for collective impact: Transforming the child serving system in disadvantaged communities, additional funding from Children's Health Queensland.

Creating conditions for collective impact: Transforming the child serving system in disadvantaged communities, additional funding from Department of Education, Training and Employment.

Creating conditions for collective impact: Transforming the child serving system in disadvantaged communities, additional funding from Benevolent Society.

2013

The cost of alcohol misuse to New South Wales government services Sydney, funded by New South Wales Audit Office.

Creating conditions for collective impact: Transforming the child serving system in disadvantaged communities. ARC Linkage grant (LP130100142)

University consortium for evidence-based crime reduction. Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grant – leading economics component.

2012

Do teacher's education levels matter? Establishing an understanding of quality of care and education funded kindergarten programs, funded by Griffith University.

Benefit-Cost Analysis of the Logan Beenleigh Young Person Project: The Next Step (TNS), funded by Department of Communities Evidence and Modelling Unit.

A betterment cost-benefit framework and methodology, funded by Federal Attorney General's Department.

2010

The costs of developmental prevention, funded by Griffith University.

Economic returns of early intervention, funded by Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.

2009

Reducing the methamphetamine problem in Australia: Evaluating innovative partnerships between police, pharmacies and other third parties, funded by National Drug Law Enforcement Research Fund.

Systematic review of procedural justice (SS13), funded by National Policing Improvement (NPIA) UK.

Systematic review of serious crime investigations (SS21), funded by National Policing Improvement (NPIA) UK.

Meta-analytic review of Legitimacy in Policing, funded by National Policing Improvement (NPIA), Centre for Evidence-Based Crime Policy UK.

Current student projects

Current PhD students

1. Nada Jevtovic - Patterns and Predictable Practices: Investigating Activities involved in Procedures of Money Laundering in Australia.

Recently graduated PhD students

1.Tsz Wah Wong - A Multi-criteria Framework to Analyze Drug Policies on Illicit Psychoactive     Drug Abuse among Adolescence: A Comparison of Australia and Hong Kong.

2. Margarita Vorsina - The economic roots of terrorism.

3. Dae Woon Kim - Policing private security: A comparative study of security industry regulation in New South Wales and Queensland.

4. Do Trung Nguyen- Critical success factors for PPPs transport infrastructure in Vietnam.

Return to top

Updated:  21 September 2020 / Responsible Officer:  Director (Research Services Division) / Page Contact:  Researchers