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The Australian National University

Dr Katrina Grant

PhD, BA Hons
Lecturer - Digital Humanities
ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences

Research interests

  • Digital art history
  • Digital Mapping
  • Theatre and Festival Culture in Early Modern Europe
  • Set Designa nd Visual Culture of Theatre
  • History of Gardens and Designed Landscapes
  • History of Maps and Cartography
  • Baroque Art
  • Italian Art and Architectural History (16th-18th centuries)
  • Art Writing
  • Grand Tour and artistic relations between Britain and Italy
  • Court culture
  • Studies in place and space
  • Arcadias and Utopias

Biography

Katrina Grant is an art historian with a background in the study of Early Modern Italy. Her research focuses on gardens and the history of landscapes, as well as the visual culture of theatre and festivals, and the connections between these two areas. Her PhD thesis (University of Melbourne, 2011) focused on the relationship between garden design and theatre in Early Modern Italy. She has published on the gardens of Lucca, history of emotions and set design, and artistic relationships between Britain and Italy in the eighteenth century. She has run the popular Melbourne Art Network website as editor and webmaster since 2010 and she is a founding editor of the online open-access art history journal emaj (emajartjournal.com). She is currently in charge of Marketing and Communications for the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ). She also has a background in educational research, including the use of new technologies for learning and assessment and worked as a Research Fellow at the Australian Council for Educational Research for several years. Her current research focuses on GIS and visualisation technologies and their potential for extending art historical research into new areas. Her main project is Digital Cartographies of the Roman Campagna, which is operating in collaboration with the British School at Rome. This project brings together historical maps with modern mapping technologies to recreate the lost landscape of the Roman Campagna, and draw together data and research from a variety of disciplines, including art and architectural history, social history, cultural geography and the history of climate and ecological change.

 

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Updated:  20 September 2017 / Responsible Officer:  Director (Research Services Division) / Page Contact:  Researchers